Corrections For The Previous Issue Of “Corrections,” The Magazine Of The Department Of Corrections

By:
brozik@gmail.com
@spidermensch

COVER STORY

Due to a continuing proofreading error, each instance of “inmate” was printed as “intimate.” In only one place was “intimate” the correct word.

SPORTS

An article about the Angola Red Hats’ 3-2 victory over the Blues Singers gave the wrong reason for the incarceration of the inmate-athlete who intercepted and returned quarterback 10237-597’s pass 54 yards for a touchdown in the third quarter. Defensive back 73362-953 is serving five consecutive life sentences after a 1998 conviction on one count of espionage and four counts of high treason, not two counts of human trafficking and three counts of aggravated arson. We regret the error/libel.

STYLE

An article about the comeback of black-and-white striped prison uniforms described the stripes incorrectly. They are horizontal, not vertical.

OP/ED

The letter to the editors expressing the view that the assignment of numbers to inmates has the effect of dehumanizing imprisoned men and women referred to the writer’s relative incorrectly as 90303-799; he is 90303-979. In the same item, the name of the penal facility in Kentucky where inmate 90303-979 is being held should have been given as the United States Penitentiary, McCreary, not MacCreary.

PERSONAL ADVERTISEMENTS

The pilot column entitled “Missed Corrections” was in its entirety a mistake and will not be included in future issues.

FUN & GAMES

An incorrect answer to the final Jumble, That Scrambled Word Game clue was given. The correct answer is FOLLOW THE RULES.

OBITUARIES

We regret that in the death notice for inmate 42581-105, recently executed by the State of Colorado, we wrote that her DNA was “99.99% a match” with blood found at the scene of a double homicide. The sentence should have read “99.99% not a match.”

ARTS & LEISURE

Because of an editing error, an article about the prison library system misidentified the most popular book among inmates nationwide as Jonathan Franzen’s The Corrections. The most popular book is in fact Mr. Franzen’s Freedom.

Corrections Magazine welcomes comments, suggestions, and complaints, but reports of persons behaving in contravention of the law should be made directly to local authorities.

 

 

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